cover crops

Community Inspired by Demo Plots

The 94 farmers trained so far in this new program said that what convinced them to sign up for conservation agriculture (CA) training was seeing the healthy green sorghum and beans in the program’s demonstration plots. The program conducted an awareness campaign prior to training by setting up demo plots in the villages.

When farmers were invited to compare the CA plots with neighboring fields, the sorghum was tall and about ready to tassel, and the lablab beans used as a cover crop to retain moisture and fix nitrogen in the soil were green and healthy-looking.  It was easy to see at a glance that the CA crops were in much better shape, so the farmers wanted to learn how to replicate those results.

The program area was chosen because of widespread food insecurity due to low crop yields from poor soils, low rainfall, and insect damage after harvest. The first group of 94 farmers has been trained in such CA practices as minimum tillage, intercropping, crop rotation, cover crops and mulching, all of which improve the soil and retain moisture. They are planning to use CA on their home plots at the start of the coming rainy season, and will receive further training on airtight grain storage and growing vegetables in their yards. The vegetables will supply much-needed food and increase nutritional diversity during the dry season when food is scarce.

Future training sessions will focus on establishing clean sources of drinking water and small- scale irrigation options for watering the kitchen gardens.

Caption: Farmers Daniel and Grace pose by a demo plot of very healthy sorghum

Tanzania Chamwino Program         
Led by Mennonite Central Committee and Local Partner Diocese of Central Tanganyika (DCT)
Story based on a report by Musa Chilemu. Photo by Lister Nyang’anyi.

 

09/28/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Home Again: Sustainable Farming Returns Felix to his Roots

My name is Félix. I’m a farmer, but there came a point when I couldn’t support my family anymore. I spent months at a time moving to other parts of the country to find work.  My wife had occasional jobs, but could only earn around 15 cents a day.  We both did what we had to do to support our seven children.  When I heard about an opportunity to receive training on ways to improve my farm and raise more food, I was eager to give it a try.

I made my depleted soil more fertile by planting cover crops and fruit trees, making organic pesticides, fungicides and fertilizer, and rotating crops, and produce a greater variety of fruits and vegetables.

You should see my farm now! I used to grow mainly corn and beans, but now have plantains, sweet potatoes, pineapple, yuca [a tuber], sesame, peanuts, papaya, hot pepper and more.  We eat most of it, but I also sell some so I no longer have to leave my family to make money.  My family’s healthier, too, because food grown in rich soil has more nutrients. I’m also lowering my costs.  My wife encourages me to continue to try new things, and helps me. We believe that you learn by doing. I’m convinced that my land can produce even more.

My hope is that God gives me strength to continue farming my parcel of land so I can leave a sustainable inheritance for my children.  I pray that God continues blessing the donors who make this program possible. I believe that they demonstrate what it really means to love our neighbors.

Photo caption: Felix explains how cover crops replenish soil nutrients

Guatemala Four Departments Program
Led by World Renew and various local partners
25 communities, 750 households, 4, 500 individuals

12/19/2017 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
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